Manly Poems – ‘Tommy’ by Rudyard Kipling

Tommy Atkins is a term used to describe a common British soldier which was already in regular use in the 19th century, but which is particularly associated with the First World War.

This poem was one in a series by Kipling called “Barrack-Room Ballads” which was dedicated “To T.A.”. The poem is a protest piece written from the perspective of the common soldier, Tommy Atkins. In it, Kipling compares the behaviour of civilians towards soldiers during peacetime to how they treat the ‘redcoats’ when war begins. The soldier notes that when there is no immediate need for him and his comrades in the minds of the people, they treat him as a pariah. However, when the political situation heats up, the soldiers are suddenly hailed as heroes and treated as such. The work ends with the solemn reminder to the reader that while he may be common and uneducated, that does not make him ignorant of their behaviour. As is common with Kipling, the last line resounds in the reader’s mind.

Tommy

I went into a public-’ouse to get a pint o’ beer,
The publican ‘e up an’ sez, “We serve no red-coats here.”
The girls be’ind the bar they laughed an’ giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an’ to myself sez I:
O it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, go away”;
But it’s “Thank you, Mister Atkins”, when the band begins to play,
The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
O it’s “Thank you, Mister Atkins”, when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but ‘adn’t none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-’alls,
But when it comes to fightin’, Lord! they’ll shove me in the stalls!
For it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, wait outside”;
But it’s “Special train for Atkins” when the trooper’s on the tide,
The troopship’s on the tide, my boys, the troopship’s on the tide,
O it’s “Special train for Atkins” when the trooper’s on the tide.

Yes, makin’ mock o’ uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an’ they’re starvation cheap;
An’ hustlin’ drunken soldiers when they’re goin’ large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin’ in full kit.
Then it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, ‘ow’s yer soul?”
But it’s “Thin red line of ‘eroes” when the drums begin to roll,
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it’s “Thin red line of ‘eroes” when the drums begin to roll.

We aren’t no thin red ‘eroes, nor we aren’t no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An’ if sometimes our conduck isn’t all your fancy paints,
Why, single men in barricks don’t grow into plaster saints;
While it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, fall be’ind”,
But it’s “Please to walk in front, sir”, when there’s trouble in the wind,
There’s trouble in the wind, my boys, there’s trouble in the wind,
O it’s “Please to walk in front, sir”, when there’s trouble in the wind.

You talk o’ better food for us, an’ schools, an’ fires, an’ all:
We’ll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don’t mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow’s Uniform is not the soldier-man’s disgrace.
For it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Chuck him out, the brute!”
But it’s “Saviour of ‘is country” when the guns begin to shoot;

An’ it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ anything you please;
An’ Tommy ain’t a bloomin’ fool — you bet that Tommy sees!

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2 Comments

Filed under Manly Poems, Poetry

2 responses to “Manly Poems – ‘Tommy’ by Rudyard Kipling

  1. I have enjoyed your introduction and other words about “Tommy.”
    I have been a fan of Kipling for 55 years … especially “Tommy” and “My Boy Jack.”

    Take care and best regards!

  2. Phil

    Have you read the ‘updated’ versions of “Tommy”?
    “I think that Kipling would have been immensely saddened if he had known that “Tommy” could still be applied 113 years after he wrote it; but not
    surprised, except possibly by the British Army being back in Kabul.”
    http://www.kipling.org.uk/rg_tommy1.htm

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